Animal Education Jobs

Any job in the education field requires, first and foremost, a teaching credential, which can typically be obtained at most four-year colleges and universities.

Most people who decide to go into teaching (such as a high school or junior high biology teachers, or elementary school science teachers), might decide on this path during their college courses, thus they can study for both a bachelor’s/master’s degree and a teaching credential concurrently. Teachers can also specialize in the area they wish to teach, which in this case would be biology, anatomy or something human/animal related.

The beauty of teaching is that you can make it as hands on (or off) as you’d like. Some teachers may be highly involved in dissecting frogs, pigs, etc., which would fall under biology, while others might prefer to stick with test tubes and chemical charts, in the vein of chemistry or physics.

Either way, if you want to teach anything related to animals, you need to be patient, engaging, enthusiastic, possess a breadth of knowledge, and have excellent public speaking skills. Also, in the university academic setting, the phrase “publish or perish” is still sometimes mentioned, which implies that college professors need to write and have their writings published in order to thrive in academia.

Educators often have more traditional schedules, although night classes sometimes make for irregular hours. People considering education as a career path should also note that class hours are just the tip of the iceberg, as educators are also called upon to attend faculty meetings, address school boards, work with department budgets, help develop curriculum, assess potential learning materials, arrange field trips, offer office hours for students who need help, offer guidance to students, and stay abreast of technological advances and new developments in their given field.

Educator’s salaries can vary widely based upon the employee’s college/university. While most people don’t go into education for the money, those who do can make a comfortable living. In addition, education allows for flexibility during holidays and summer months, where, sometimes, a second job can supplement income.

In California, the process of obtaining a single-subject teaching credential for primary, middle schools, high schools and adult education schools begins in college, where a bachelor’s degree is obtained from an accredited college or university. Those who wish to teach biology or a science must also complete a single-subject teacher preparation program that exhibits successful student teaching, as well as obtain a formal recommendation for the credential by the California college or university where their program was completed.

In addition, teachers must either achieve a passing score on the appropriate subject-matter examination(s), or complete a Commission-approved subject-matter program or its equivalent and obtain verification of completion from the authorized person in the education department of a California college or university.

Additional animal education requirements include knowledge and the passing of Developing English Language Skills, including reading requirements, exhibited by completing a comprehensive reading instruction course that includes the systematic study of phonemic awareness, phonics, and decoding; literature, language and comprehension; and diagnostic and early intervention techniques.

Educators in the State of California must also complete a course (two semester units or three quarter units) in the provisions and principles of the U.S. Constitution, or pass an examination given by a regionally-accredited college or university.

Lastly, they must complete foundational computer technology course work that includes general and specialized skills in the use of computers in educational settings.

While pay is not usually a motivating factor when following the path of animal educator, it is certainly expected that the farther up the teaching chain you travel, the higher your income will be (college professors draw a higher salary than junior high science teachers, for example).


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