National Parks Professional Technician Jobs

Professional technicians are the backbone of the National Forest Service. Although technicians predominantly assist scientific personnel with various data gathering techniques, they are considered to be full collaborative members of the professional scientific teams. They support the effective development and achievement of National Forest Service priorities, which are to protect, restore and maintain the wildlife habitats and lands under their care.

Professional technicians make up the largest number of technical employees working within the National Forest Service.

The types of professional technician positions available are varied. Hiring needs at any specific forest area or region largely depend on the natural resource management issues specific to the area and the type of public access the area affords. The measurements, data samples, compilations and reports that professional technicians provide are vital to the development and implementation of the National Forest Service projects and programs. Their reports help in areas such as road and trail construction and improvement, fire prevention and reforestation, wildlife management and insect and disease control.

FACT! Although the name may suggest otherwise, not all national forests are entirely forested. Some house vast areas of glaciers and grasslands.

Job Descriptions

The range of science specialists and technicians that keep the National Forest Service lands up and running is astounding. Almost every scientific specialty known is a valuable component in the collaborative effort to protect, restore and conserve our national wilderness areas.

  • Archeological Technicians provide technical support to archeological studies and research through information and data gathering, development and dissemination.
  • Biological Science Technicians use specialized tools, materials and equipment to collect and analyze data. Then they compile those findings in technical reports that support a variety of biological science research projects.
  • Forestry Technicians work in support of all aspects of national forest resource management including recreation, ecology, data collection, trails and fire prevention. They assist foresters and other resource management specialists in wilderness improvement, maintenance and rehabilitation.
  • Hydrologic Technicians collect the data and samples in order to prepare the reports used for technical support of hydrology and watershed ecosystems care, restoration and maintenance.
  • Range Technicians conduct tests and field studies, prepare data samples and note field conditions, and organize information reports in support of the management, development and conservation of grasslands or other range resources.
  • Survey Technicians perform a variety of surveying tasks. This includes collecting data, using surveying instruments and simple hand instruments, conducting traverse surveys, and measuring land areas for excavation or mapping.

FACT! Did you know that the longest living organisms on earth are trees? The Inyo national Forest is home to what may be the oldest organism in the world, a bristle-cone pine tree the rangers call Methuselah. It’s exact location within the park is a closely guarded secret.

Education and Pay

To qualify to work as a science technician for the National Forest Service, you must have a high school diploma or equivalency, and a minimum of one year of specialized experience working in the same field. Alternatively, you may substitute education for job experience if you have completed a bachelor’s degree or at least four full years of study at an accredited higher learning institution with related coursework.

Forest Service science technicians typically start off at grade levels 5-6 of the General Schedule (GS) category of the Federal Wage System. While promotions between grades do take some time, workers on extended assignments can be promoted up a single grade level and receive a small pay increase after one year of satisfactory employment. Pay goes up with each grade increase.

Quick Summary:

  • The types of science technician positions available are as varied as the diverse terrain and habitats of the national forest lands themselves.
  • Science technicians must have a minimum of one year of specialized experience working in the field, and to have performed work similar to the duties required by the job.
  • Education may be substituted for job experience if you have completed a bachelor’s degree or at least four full years of study at an accredited higher learning institution with related coursework.
  • Forest Service science technicians typically start off at grade levels 5-6 of the General Schedule (GS) category of the Federal Wage System.
  • After one year of satisfactory job performance, you may be promoted to a higher pay grade level.
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