Mountain Bike Patroller Jobs

Mountain biking is an adrenaline pumping sport that requires balance, endurance, and strength. Handling a bike on rocky roads, riding down tight lift-accessed downhill runs, or going cross country on a muddy single track is a great way to explore the mountains – until you get hurt or need help. That’s when you need a mountain bike patroller.

Mountain bike patrollers assist, educate, and help bikers, hikers, and other trail users. They work on a bike patrol that monitors specific riding zones – like a ski resort during the summer months or a local trail system. It’s an awesome outdoor job.

Mountain Bike Patrollers Ride Their Bikes Along Trails to Make Sure they are Safe

Mountain bike patrols are made up of volunteers and trained patrollers. These patrollers enforce rider safety, provide condition reports, open and close trails, help lost riders, file incident reports, evacuate chair lifts, maintain trails, promote responsible riding, and respond to both medical and mechanical emergencies.

Bike patrollers are an active presence on the mountain and trail system. They are knowledgeable of the terrain and conditions, have excellent bike handling skills, are certified in first aid, and are willing to help people in need. Plus, they get to ride their mountain bikes for their job.

While on duty they’re always on call to respond to medical, mechanical, or other emergency calls. A mountain bike patroller is expected to carry the appropriate tools for the job – food, water, first aid kit, and bike repair tools like duct tape, pump, patch kits, spoke wrenches, allen wrenches, zip ties, tire levers, or chain tools.

Patrollers are usually the first trained responder to a scene. They are expected to have a Wilderness First Responder or EMT certification. A medical incident may be a downhill biker who crashed into tree, a hiker that sprained an ankle, or a biker who broke their arm. The mountain bike patroller assesses, treats, and transports the patient to definitive care if necessary.

Other typical calls include bike mechanical issues. Flat tires, broken chains, derailleur repair, brake adjustments, and wheel fixes are all common issues faced by mountain bikers. Bike patrollers help guests fix their bikes so that they can continue to enjoy their day on the trails.

Mountain bike patrollers can find work with established bike patrols. They may work with ski resorts, land managers, outdoor races, bike events, or local mountain bike clubs. These patrols are responsible for the terrain and the guests on the trails in specific patrolled areas only.

Try to find a job with a patrol that is recognized by the International Mountain Bike Association and the National Mountain Bike Patrol. The IMBA is a non-profit educational association that was established to “create, enhance, and preserve the trail experience.” The NMBP is a branch of the IMBA. It began in 1995 and now represents over 600 patrollers on over 60 different bike patrols.



A mountain bike patrol job can be a seasonal or year round job depending on your geographic location and weather. In most mountain towns, many ski patrollers work as bike patrollers during the summer – making patrolling a full time, year-round job. For their hard work, patrollers are paid an hourly rate of $11 to $20 per hour and typically make about $18,000 to $30,000 per year.

Mountain bike patrollers spend their time on their bike in the mountains responding to different calls. If you love mountain biking, this might be the best job for you. There aren’t too many jobs where you get paid to be outdoors riding your bike.

Quick Facts About Mountain Bike Patrol Jobs

Job Title: Mountain Bike Patroller
Office: Mountain bike trails, Ski resorts
Description: Assist, educate, and help trail users
Certifications/Education: First aid certification
Necessary Skills: Willingness to help others, Mountain biking skills
Potential Employers: Ski resorts, Mountain bike clubs, Events, Races, Land managers
Pay: $11 to $20 per hour

Helpful Mountain Bike Patroller Employment Links:

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