Nanny Screening, Pay, and Advice

(Nanny Interview Cont.)

How is a potential nanny screened? What kind of safety measures are in place?

There is a detailed application process made of 8 pages, a resume review and reference names and numbers to call. Also criminal background checks, driving record, and identity verification. Not to mention the most important interview and Q & A process that happens first over the phone and then in person.

Can you explain any differences between a full-time/live-in nanny and other nanny services?

A full-time or live-in nanny knows the game plan on a much deeper level.
She understands the childrearing philosophies of the parents and acts as a team member to uphold the household functioning with the kids and childcare tasks throughout the day.

She knows the schedule, where to take kids, who the dentist is and when to schedule haircuts. She knows which groceries to buy and what foods the kids like. The family dog can be walked on occasion or taken to the vet if needed. If there is a preschool involved, maybe the nanny would help out there once a week or drive on a field trip for an older child. The nanny helps to plan after-school and educational activities, classes and lessons, etc. She also keeps the household running smoothly when the parents are away so they can come home and spend quality time with their kids.

How much does a nanny get paid?

Each candidate comes up with what they think they need and is worth and depending on their answer we set their expectations and tell them what we are willing to get them. The average first time nanny may make $10-12 per hour, but if they meet our criteria, they usually start out at $15 per hour and can make up to $25 per hour depending on the level of duties and number of kids.

What tips would you give a new nanny starting out?

Start in a daycare, working at summer camps, a church nursery, and volunteer wherever the kids programs are, and you’ll gain the experience you need to get started.
The most place-able nannies have made babysitting jobs and childcare positions into longer term relationships with families who are thrilled to vouch for them. Don’t burn bridges or be a job hopper! Stay at your job at least one year, or if it’s a summer role, stay in touch. Ask to visit kids you no longer babysit for. The genuine nannies are beloved for their connection and the impact they’ve made on their families and the kids!

You can find out more about Rebecca and A Nanny for U at http://www.anannyforu.com/.

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